Archive for the ‘Book’ Category

Light on Leeds Podcast

Killing Time in Cambridge book cover

I was honoured and delighted to be invited by Hazel to be interviewed for her podcast Light on Leeds.

She wanted to ask me about my writing, my book, the Fens and Cambridge.

Here is the link to her podcast:

https://www.lightonleeds.com/episodes/light-on-episode-4-philip-cumberland-author?fbclid=IwAR0Rqhq61E1ObUfbHK4-Hy2xcySyImPWf4qCk0wfW-HS1UIqFrBSLHzx1VA#

To hear more of Hazel’s podcasts please visit her site.

https://www.lightonleeds.com/

Cambridge Black by Alison Bruce, a review.

Cambridge Black written by Alison Bruce

I find it is always a balancing act when writing reviews, trying not to spoil the plot for would-be readers but giving some sense of what lies between the book’s covers.

Cambridge Black is the seventh in Alison Bruce’s DC Gary Goodhew series. I am sure most readers will like myself have read some, possibly all of the preceding books and have a familiarity with the characters.

The story centres around three quest’s, Amy’s for the truth concerning her father’s conviction for murder, Sue Gully’s search for her father and Gary Goodhew’s hunt for those responsible for his grandfather’s murder.

The story is well-plotted and paced.

Cambridge is as all the Goodhew novels the setting for Cambridge Black. Alison Bruce has a great affection for the city which shows in the writing. I enjoy the familiarity of many places in the story, probably something I share with other fans.

I thoroughly enjoyed the twisting turning story as DC Goodhew and the team pursue the perpetrators of a current and simultaneously two other historic unsolved cases. The writing as always is exceptionally fine, the descriptions and scene-setting excellent. I was racing through the pages towards the end as the story reached its nail-biting climax.

This was retiring DI Marx’s last case; I hope it won’t be the last case for DC Gary Goodhew too.

My Writing Bag

The Writing bag ready for action

I have a back pack, my writing bag, that accompanies me on research trips, it was a Christmas present from my wife and it is very practical. The bag contains maps, notebooks, pens and something to eat. Sometimes I take a small tablet computer with me which fits inside nicely, a flask of drink and occasionally an umbrella clipped to the outside.

Often I will find somewhere to write while I am out, a library, a cafe, pub or even on a nice day a bench outside, in a park, a garden or other public space. My favourite writing places are probably libraries, there are additional means of research available using the library’s computers and internet.

My writing bag hasn’t been out at all this last year, unsurprising really with the lock down, I am beginning to assemble two new books in my mind and have written a few opening chapters for both. But I need to get out to visit the places I m writing about to find those extra details that Google cannot provide. At some point in the future I will need to return to Cambridge to help D I Arnold Lane with his enquiries. Hopefully soon it will be safe enough for a few day trips and excursions. My writing bag and me.

What Lies Beyond Sci-Fi Stories of the Future, Edited byJ K Larkin, a review

What Lies Beyond

Stephen Oliver, one of the book’s contributing authors gave me the heads up on this terrific collection.

The Generalist is Stephen’s contribution and thoroughly deserves its place in this book with the other excellent stories. Stephen’s stories are always unusual and quirky not only displaying an orignality of thought but also quality writing.

A cousin of mine named Startruck her favourite in an earlier collection “Where the Wild Winds Blow.” Another book showcasing some of Stephen’s work.

So what of the other stories? they were all exceptionally good but I particularly enjoyed Preacher by Lisa Diaz Meyer and The Felinedae Mission by Debbie De Louise, those who have cats would regard this as entirely plausible.

Leaping off

Killing Time in Cambridge

Well, I have leapt off the diving board and published my novel Killing Time in Cambridge. The first printed paperback book arrived on Wednesday and I have had my first review for the Kindle version.

Rather mixed feelings, relief that I have finally done it, a sense of tiredness and anticlimax. I hope that it will not only sell but more importantly those who read it enjoy the story, The feedback so far has been favourable.

My next novel is underway whether it will get finished is always an open question but I am pleased with the opening chapter. It is slightly different from the first, with different characters. However if Killing Time in Cambridge proves popular Arnold Lane may have a second outing.

If you would like to buy it on Amazon click here:

Killing Time in Cmbridgehttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Killing-Time-Cambridge-Philip-Cumberland/dp/1916481779/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1606719444&sr=8-1

Standing on the Diving Board

The Front Cover

I am getting close to finishing my book the writing is done and the corrections are well underway. The cover design is nearly finished and I hope to publish very soon.

It is an interesting situation for me to be in, I have had some writing published and been touched that people have enjoyed my work. There is no greater vote of confidence than someone buying your work, no, perhaps there is. A lady picked up a copy of “Where The Wild Winds Blow” at a U3A meeting looked at my name badge and asked if I had written anything in the book she held. When I said I had, she leafed through the book and started reading, “Where does the Pope buy his Frocks?” after a few minutes she was laughing out loud. It was a moment of pure magic for me.

At the moment I have mixed emotions, I want to be finished and published but hesitant, wondering about how much more polishing and tweaking it needs to make it as good as possible.

 I suppose the closest analogy is someone standing on a high diving board for the first time. Edging their way to the end wanting to jump, to dive in but worried that the neatly executed movement they have planned will end in a belly flop.

There is only one way to find out and I will in the next few weeks when I dive in.

In the meantime:

Where Does the Pope Buy His Frocks?

“I often talk to myself, sometimes out loud, mostly though within the confines of my mind. I am not sure whether it is just my way of marshalling thoughts or a rehearsal of how the words may sound when spoken.”

“That’s very interesting Mr Fontain,” said Miss Rogers, my analyst, “But you must realise there are times when sharing your thoughts vocally may not be appropriate.”

“I don’t know, sometimes it can liven up a boring occasion, even make it interesting.”

“It can offend though.”

“No one has the right not to be offended.”

“What about the occasion of the Queen’s visit?”

“All I said was she is not my mum and I wish she would stop sending me begging letters.”

“But why use the megaphone?”

“She was a long way off and I wanted her to hear, I am fed up with her writing to me, I don’t even know the woman. It got a lot of laughs though, a cheer and a round of applause.”

“What about the fight afterwards.”

“The Queen started that, well some of the blokes with her did.”

“The police?”

“They had no right to try and steal my megaphone, it cost me a lot of money. It is a good job the people nearby thought the same, I’ve still got my megaphone thanks to them.”

“Would those people be the Fens Republicans?”

“I think some of them might be, I know a couple come from Ely, some from Chatteris and at least one from Huntingdon.”

“The Queen had to cut short her visit because of the fighting; a lot of people were very disappointed.”

“Well, they shouldn’t have started the fights then should they? As I said, no one has the right not to be offended. When I am offended I don’t start fighting people and trying to steal their stuff do I?”

“No, you use your megaphone. What about the visit by the Pope to Cambridge?”

“All I said was I wonder if he got his frock from Marks and Spencer or John Lewis.”

“Through your megaphone wasn’t it?”

“Most people thought it was hilarious. I think even the Pope had a chuckle.”

“That caused more trouble.”

“The police again, trying to nick my megaphone, it was a good job most of the crowd were on my side and I had my bike handy for a swift getaway.”

“The getaway caused problems too didn’t it?”

“The students on their bikes you mean?”

“Yes, they blocked off most of the roads in the city centre to stop the police didn’t they?”

“I heard about that. Again, it was the police causing trouble; you would think they would be chasing criminals wouldn’t you?”

“How on earth did you manage to smuggle you megaphone into Parliament?”

“It wasn’t easy, I had it wrapped up in a parcel and pretended to be a courier delivering it to an MP. Once I was in I got changed and sneaked into the chamber.”

“But why shout out Black Rod stole my elephant?”

“Because what I really feel, what I genuinely believe, I cannot say. My voice is silent on the really important issues – on the lessons we haven’t learned. Mostly, I talk to myself; that audience always listens.”

“Okay, Mr Fontain same time next week. Back to your cell now.”

I am a proud member of Whittlesey Wordsmiths, a writing and publishing Cooperative, you might like to find out more about these books from our collection

Click on the picture to read more or order from Amazon

Front cover of a Following Wind click on the picture to read more or order from Amazon
The Railway Carriage Child. Click on the picture for more information or to order
Witch Way Click on the picture for more information or to order
A year before Christmas click on the picture for more information or to order
Unleash Your Dreams: Going Beyond Goal Setting (NLP, the Law of Attraction, the Universe and You Book 1) by [Stephen Oliver]
Unleash Your Dreams. Click on the picture for more information or to order.

Witch Way a review

Witch Way

Witch Way

Cathy Cade’s book of short stories and poems is a wonderful collection of well-written pieces, each one beautifully crafted.

The range of subjects is wide and eclectic embracing beautifully written children’s stories, fascinating mysteries together with truly delightful poetry. There is something in here for everyone, every item is a brightly polished gem.

My favourite but only just is the beautifully picturesque Witch Way. The characters inhabit your imagination, so beautifully are they drawn. It is for me like watching a film of the story rather than reading the words on the page.

It is a gift few writers have.

Cathy is a writer of extraordinary ability I am looking forward to reading more of her work.

Available on Amazon

Witch Way on Amazon

It will soon be available on Smash Words too:

Smashwords

Cathy’s Blog is always worth a visit:

Cathy’s Blog

Beau Death by Peter Lovesey a review.

Beau Death cover2

Beau Death written by Peter Lovesey

There is usually at least one of Peter Lovesey’s books in my “to be read pile”.  Of the Peter Diamond series, I now have only one more to read, unless of course there is another ready to publish.

I have enjoyed all the Peter Diamond novels but for me Beau Death is the best so far.

Following a cracking start, literally, a wrecking ball smashes into the top of an old house in Twerton, exposing the remains of a long hidden body. The beginning of a herculean quest for Deective Superintendent Peter Diamond and his team. Not only to establish the identity of the corpse but to discover the circumstances of its death.

As with the majority of the Peter Diamond novels the city of Bath is the setting.

With each new book there is a new visit, for us readers. Each time we learn a little more about the place and its rich history. This outing introduces Beau Nash to those of us, who know little, not only of Bath but the characters which helped shape the city.

As with all good books it is difficult to put down, resolution waits until the end of the story and is satisfying. I will be ordering Killing with Confetti, the latest Peter Diamond book, shortly. Ready to be placed on the TBR pile.

An Inconvenient Death by Miles Goslett (a review)

an incovenient death web

An Inconvenient Death by Miles Golett

 

Those of us old to remember the build up to the ill conceived Iraq war are familiar with the name Dr David Kelly.

At the time of his death, 45 minute warnings, talk of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs) and photographs filled the media supposedly showing large missiles on lorries, ready to be blasted at Saddam Hussein’s enemies, us, the UK or the U.S.

In this rush to war there were however, dissenting voices, a desire for certainty before committing lives and resources to a conflict which could perhaps be avoided. One of those casting doubt, was Andrew Gillingham, a BBC Radio 4 journalist, who’s well placed source cast doubt on the government narrative.

The hunt was soon on for this well placed source and within days Dr David Kelly’s name became known. His death in the midst of parliamentary enquiries by the Intelligence and Foreign Affairs Committees closed down lines of enquiry.

Although the book’s title is An Inconvenient Death, at the time of Kelly’s demise it seemed to many of us it was all too convenient. Goslett’s book is a meticulous attempt to try and establish a semblance of the truth, to clear away the clutter. He casts doubt over the whole investigation of Kelly’s death gaining and sharing information not disclosed at the time. He also exposes the shortcomings of the hastily established Hutton Inquiry held into Kelly’s death.

This book may not of itself get the Kelly case reopened but it ought to help, we owe it to Dr David Kelly to find the truth and if that truth is inconvenient to members of the establishment so be it.

 

 

Bad to the Bone a review.

Bad to the Bone

Bad To The Bone by Tony J Forder

I met Tony J Forder at a book signing hosted by Waterstones in Peterborough last year, I was there to buy a signed copy of Eva Jordan’s new book Time Will Tell.

After listening to  a reading from Tony’s latest book I succumbed to the temptation and bought a copy of his first book, Bad to The Bone, which he kindly signed for me. My to be read pile is diminishing slowly it was therefore only recently that I managed to read this, his first novel.

A good indication of the quality of a book for me is the reluctance to put it down and the eagerness to resume reading as soon as any opportunity presents itself, Bad to the Bone easily fitted into this criteria. It is a cracking read and those of us who know the area feel a great affinity with the places the story occupies.

We are introduced to Detective Inspector Jimmy Bliss and his colleague Detective Constable Penny Chandler. The characters are well drawn and they weave their way through a convoluted finely drawn plot. An excellent book and a cracking read, I will track down a copy of The Scent of Guilt, the second in the series with the intention of getting to read it at the earliest opportunity.

 

Grumpy old fart!!!

"If you talk to God you're religious. If God talks to you, you're psychotic."

Marsha Ingrao - Always Write

Having fun blogging with friends

Later life

Enjoying Twilight Years

Dirty Sci-Fi Buddha

Musings and books from a grunty overthinker

Seclusion 101 with AnneMarie

Life After Retirement

CabbieBlog

Taxi Talk Without Tipping

° BLOG ° Gabriele Romano

The flight of tomorrow

My Life With Gracie

A Backyard Garden Is A Perfect Place For Chickens

Words and Fictions

Jessica Norrie on writing, books and language - in her own words.

Damyanti Biswas

For lovers of reading, writing, travel, humanity

www.mycancerand.me/

The highs, the lows and the bits in between.

Tessa’s poems

Poetry from a Septuagenarian

Nicholas C. Rossis

dream-protecting author

Linda's Book Bag

Loving books and reading

John Ager's Home on the Web!

reflecting my eclectic (and sometimes erratic) life

Stuart Orme

Historian, Folklorist, Writer, Re-enactor, Museum Professional. Follow me on Twitter: @stuartorme

thedrabble.wordpress.com/

Shortness of Breadth

Journey2Motivate

Journey2Motivate

Best Dog Training Tips & Tricks

Dog Training Guidance

Fenlandphil's Blog

A blog from the low country

So You think you've got problems?

The advice columns of two eccentric agony aunts who guide the bewildered of Britain through their personal problems,

The Art of Blogging

For bloggers who aspire to inspire

Shreya Vikram

Blurring the lines between poetry and prose

How I Killed Betty!

Mad as a box of frogs? Most probably ... but if I can’t be perfect, then I’ll happily be fabulously imperfect!

The Nerdy Lion

Lions can wear glasses too

Seriousgardener's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

The Incomplete Verse

Here I share words and illustrations I discover on the journey within the crevices of my mind and the outside world. 💚

Dread Poets Sobriety

Irreverence's Glittering New Low!

MovieBabble

The Casual Way to Discuss Movies

Mistakes Writers Make ...

... and how to put them right! Advice and opportunities for new, aspiring and upcoming journalists and writers of non-fiction

Writing Wrinkles

Smoothing the wrinkles in this wrinkly's writing

Alice Von Wonderland

I wander wherever my adventures take me

estherchiltonblog

Esther Chilton - Writer and Tutor

lactosefreelovelies

Lots of lovely lactose free products.